ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST 2018

by Editor on December 25, 2017

Photo: Jim Scarff

Our Top 10 Most Endangered Animals

For the second year in a row, we’ve got a new Number One Most Endangered Animal—the northern right whale. However, we hasten to add that 2017’s most endangered creature, a diminutive Mexican dolphin known as the vaquita, is no less endangered than it was a year ago. In fact, you’ll now find it in the #2 spot, right behind the right whale.

The reason for the switch? We did it to call attention not only to the plight of the right whale, whose population is now in renewed crisis following years of what seemed a heartening recovery, but also to sound an alarm about global warming, which appears to be a major cause of the right whale’s most recent problems. All around the globe, climate change is affecting numerous threatened species in many different and serious ways, and if we humans fail to get a handle on the effect we’re having on climate, we’re likely to lose many types of animals we cherish. [click to continue…]

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ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST 2017

by Editor on February 13, 2017

Vaquita. Photo: NOAA Fisheries.

Our Top 10 Most Endangered Animals

For the first time since AAW began publishing its Top 10 List of Endangered Species, we’ve got a new Number One Most Endangered Animal. This unfortunate creature is the vaquita, a tiny porpoise that lives in the Gulf of Mexico and whose population has dropped by half in just the past year. The reason for it’s sharp decline: it keeps getting caught up and drowning in illegal fishing nets used by seafood harvesters in Mexico. There are now only 30 of these animals left, and their prospects do not look good.

The vaquita replaces the ivory-billed woodpecker in the top slot—not because we don’t still hold out some hope that someone, some day, will see an ivory-billed again, but because the vaquita requires the urgent attention of the conservation world right now if it’s going to remain with us much longer. The ivory-billed woodpecker, meanwhile, has gone down to number 10 on our list.

Here’s a link to our full 10 most endangered animal species list. And as review our list, please keep in mind is that there currently are thousands of birds and animals that may not be with us in a couple of decades. The many threats facing them include habitat loss—in many cases due to the rapid destruction of the world’s rain forests—as well as illegal hunting (which has increased astronomically in recent years), and global climate change, which is having a great effect even on wildlife habitat this is not being directly destroyed by humans. [click to continue…]

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ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST 2016

by Editor on January 11, 2016

Photo Credit: Coke Smith, CokeSmithPhotoTravel.com


Our Top 10 Most Endangered Animals

In each of the previous years that we at AAW have published our selected list of the world’s 10 most endangered animal species, we’ve invariably made a few changes, switching out one or two creatures for another couple of imperiled birds or animals. This was never because the bird or animal being removed was in any less danger of going extinct or any less deserving of attention than the endangered species we were replacing it with; the switch was always made merely to give our readers the opportunity to learn about a different animal in need of human action to prevent it from vanishing off the face of the earth.

In fact, the important thing to keep in mind is that there currently are thousands of birds and animals that may not be with us in a couple of decades. The many threats facing them include habitat loss—in many cases due to the rapid destruction of the world’s rain forests—as well as illegal hunting (which has increased astronomically in recent years), and global climate change, which is having a great effect even on wildlife habitat this is not being directly destroyed by humans. [click to continue…]

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NEW HOPE FOR AMERICAN BATS

by Editor on August 20, 2015

A little brown bat objects to being handled by a researcher. Photo: USFWS

A little brown bat objects to being handled by a researcher. Photo: USFWS

Likely Cure Found For White Nose Syndrome

In the eastern U.S. and Canada, anyone who has regularly spent time outdoors during the past several years has probably noticed that once-plentiful bats have almost disappeared from our evening skies. This worrisome scarcity is due to the ravages of a fungal illness known as White Nose Syndrome (WNS), which to date has killed an estimated 6 million of the insectivorous flying mammals in the U.S. and Canada—up to 90 percent of the bat population in some areas. Conservationists have been concerned that WNS—which was inadvertently introduced to North America from Europe—might eventually push some bat species toward extinction.

But biologists are reporting that they may finally have a handle on the problem. In May, scientists in Missouri released 75 bats that had that been successfully treated for the deadly illness using a bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous) found to inhibit the growth of the fugus that causes it. Further trials of the promising treatment are planned. [click to continue…]

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WHALE RIDER

by Editor on July 19, 2015

A Bottlenose Dolphin Hitches A Ride From A Humpback Whale Off Hawaii

A Bottlenose Dolphin Hitches A Ride From A Blue Whale Off Hawaii

Interspecies Play

The behavior depicted in the photo above—a bottlenose dolphin sliding down the back of a humpback whale—is not a fluke. Scientists and tourists alike have witnessed this strange and marvelous interspecies interaction time and time again in the waters around the Hawaiian Islands.

While most animal behaviors are connected in some way to the animals’ survival, scientists say that in this case, the most logical explanation is that the two species merely enjoy playing together. More information is available here.

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AFRICAN RAT SNIFFS OUT BOMBS

by Editor on April 22, 2015

A Species Of Giant Rat Native To Africa Is Being Used To Keep People Safe. Photo: USFWS

A Species Of Giant Rat Native To Africa Is Being Used To Keep People Safe. Photo: USFWS

This Huge Rodent Is Better Than A Metal Detector At Sniffing Out Deadly Land Mines

In some parts of sub-Saharan Africa, hidden land mines are a major threat to the civilian population. Left over from military conflicts that periodically sweep the continent, they often injure or even kill children at play and adults who are trying to work farmland or otherwise go about their daily business.

Finding and disposing of buried mines is usually a slow, difficult, and dangerous process because, while they can be located with electronic metal detectors, the devices constantly give out false alarms caused by such non-lethal pieces of lost or discarded metal as nails, screws, and machine parts. So, mine hunters in the formerly war-torn country of Angola are increasing relying instead on the Gambian rat, a native rodent with a cat-sized body and an exquisite nose for buried items that emanate odors, including explosives.

The Gambian rat, also called the African rat, or the pouched rat, is a common sub-Saharan species that has been domesticated. The animals are sold around the world in the pet trade—in fact, they’ve become an invasive species in Florida, where enough of them have escaped or been released to form a breeding population. [click to continue…]

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BIG INCREASE IN PANDA NUMBERS

by Editor on March 12, 2015

There Are Now More Wild Pandas Than There Have Been In Several Decades

There Are More Wild Pandas Now Than There Have Been In Several Decades (Although This Photo Is Of A Captive Panda)

The Population Of Wild Pandas Has Gone Up Since The Animals Last Were Counted

Good news is often hard to come by in the world of endangered species conservation. So when we hear something positive we like to celebrate. What we’re most happy about right now is a report from the Chinese government that the number of giant pandas in the wild has undergone a sizable increase in the last dozen years.

According to Chinese wildlife officials, there are now 1,864 pandas living in the bamboo forests of Sichuan, Shaanxi, and Gansu provinces in southern China, up from a population of 1,596 in 2003. This is an increase of nearly 17 percent. [click to continue…]

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