FREE ENDANGERED AMPHIBIAN BOOKS

by Editor on August 9, 2014

A Red-Eyed Tree Frog. Photo Taken in Costa Rica by charlesjsharp

A Red-Eyed Tree Frog. Photo Taken in Costa Rica By charlesjsharp

Teachers And Students Take Note: Here’s A Free Set Of Books On Threatened Amphibians

Aamphibians are among the animals hit hardest by such environmental factors as climate change, manmade chemicals in the air and water, habitat destruction due to human activity, and a deadly fungal illness that has been spreading around the globe. Many frogs and other amphibian species have been designated as Endangered or Threatened—and some have even gone extinct.

Fortunately, there are a number of groups dedicated to the fight to conserve amphibians and the wild, wet habitats they need to survive. One such organization is called the Amphibian Survival Alliance. Currently, the ASA is hoping to attract as many like-minded people as possible to the cause of amphibian conservation—and one way they are doing this is by giving away an electronic version of a gorgeous collection of books containing information about all the earth’s Threatened and Endangered amphibian species. [click to continue…]

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ELEPHANT POACHING IN AFRICA

by Editor on August 9, 2014

Illegal Hunters Are Killing African Elephants At An Alarming Rate. Photo: nickname|2006

Illegal Hunters Are Killing African Elephants At An Alarming Rate. Photo: nickandme|2006

Illegal Hunting Is Endangering The Last Of The Wild Elephants In Africa

The African elephant ranks among the most majestic animals in the world. Not only is the elephant earth’s largest land animal, but it is also one of the most intelligent creatures, and its life span is almost as long as ours. When elephant mothers are pregnant, they carry their their unborn babies for more than twice as long as a human mother does. Elephants live in family groups where they take care of one another.

Unfortunately, illegal hunting, or poaching, of elephants has increased greatly over the last 10 years. So many thousands of elephants are now killed all over Africa each year that the animals are in danger of vanishing from the wild. [click to continue…]

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FERAL ANIMALS

by Editor on August 9, 2014

Feral Cats Kill More Than Half A Billion Birds A Year. Photo: Stavrolos

Feral Cats Kill More Than Half A Billion Birds A Year. Photo: Stavrolos

Feral Pets And Livestock Take A Terrible Toll On Wild Creatures And Wildlife Habitats

A feral animal is a pet or farm animal that lives in the wild after having escaped or been released. For just a few examples, in America there are millions of feral cats and pigs, and tens of thousands of feral horses and burros.

Feral animals are almost always highly destructive to wildlife and the places where wild animals live because they do not have a natural place in those environments and among those animals. For instance, feral and free-roaming cats are able to kill hundreds of millions of North American birds each year because the birds did not evolve in an environment that included cats. Our birds evolved natural defenses to protect themselves and their young against native predators such as hawks, owls, raccoons, and snakes—but never against cats. [click to continue…]

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THE WORLD’S LARGEST DOLPHIN

by Editor on August 8, 2014

When Is A Whale Not A Whale?

When Is A Whale Not A Whale?

Really? The Killer Dolphin?

Orcas certainly look like whales to us. After all, they grow to a length of 30 feet. But scientists have classified them as being in the same family—Delphinidae—as the 31 other species of ocean-dwelling dolphins, most of which are so much smaller than orcas that orcas would gladly eat them if they had a chance.

Although the orca’s huge size seems un-dolphinlike to us, its curved dorsal fin and pyramid-shaped teeth identify it as a true member of the dolphin family. Orcas also travel in large family groups, which is a behavioral characteristic that distinguishes dolphins from other, less gregarious, kinds of cetaceans such as propoises and baleen whales. [click to continue…]

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HOW ANIMALS EAT

by Editor on August 8, 2014

A Red Deer Browses on Tall Ferns. Photo: Kevin Law

A Red Deer Browses on Tall Ferns. Photo: Kevin Law

Some Plant Eaters Graze, Others Browse—And Some Do Both. What’s The Difference?

Aanimals with hooves, such as deer, antelope, sheep, goats, horses, and cattle have different strategies for feeding themselves. Some, such as horses and cattle, are grazers, which means they eat grass. In fact, the word “graze” is derived from the word “grass.”

Other animals, including most members of the deer family, are browsers. This means that they eat a variety of plant material including leaves, tree bark, and the tips of branches. When people see deer eating shrubs in their backyards, those deer are browsing on the shrubs.

Grazing works well for plant-eaters that live and feed in open areas where grass is plentiful. But grass is scarce in forests and swamps, and that’s where browsers have an advantage. However, most browsing animals will do some grazing when they are in a meadow, and many grazers will sample vegetation other than grass when they are moving through a woodland. Nonetheless, grazers and browsers usually have different types of teeth to help them bite and chew the foods they eat most often. [click to continue…]

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DOLPHINS AND PORPOISES

by Editor on August 8, 2014

Dolphins & Porpoises: Do You Know The Difference?

Are These Creatures Dolphins, Or Porpoises?

A Dolphin And A Porpoise Are Similar—But Also Different. Here’s How To Tell Them Apart

The names “dolphin” and “porpoise” are often used interchangeably. And no wonder: to human eyes these two sea creatures look and act very much alike. However, there are some major differences in both appearance and behavior. In addition, they belong to two distinct families of Cetaceans—the scientific order that includes dolphins, whales, and porpoises. Within the Cetacean order, the six species of porpoise are part of the Phocoenidae family, while the 32 oceanic dolphin species are Delphinidae. [click to continue…]

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SHARK ATTACK!

by Editor on August 6, 2014

The Hammerhead Is One Of The 10 Most Dangerous Sharks. Photo: Rodtico21

The Hammerhead Is One Of The 10 Most Dangerous Sharks. Photo: Rodtico21

A List And Map Of Every Reported Attack By Sharks Against Humans In The Last 500 Years!

The idea of getting attacked by a shark is frightening to most of us who live near the ocean. However, shark attacks are actually very rare occurrences—and fatal shark attacks are even rarer still.

In addition, only a few species of shark have been known to bite people with any frequency. Elsewhere on All About Wildlife, you’ll find a list of The 10 Most Dangerous Sharks.

According to the National Shark Attack Files, 2,665 attacks by sharks on people have been reported since 1580. Of those attacks, fewer than 500 have proven fatal. [click to continue…]

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